Author Archives: Neville

About Neville

NevBlog.com - Tracking the road to financial success from the age of 22 (now 27).

December 2014 Goals

Here’s my December 2014 Goals:

december-2014-goals

Due to the holidays (and fun!) I’ll be traveling a whole helluva lot this month basically till February 2014.

Vail –> Austin –> Houston–> Los Angeles –> India –> Japan

(Btw….anyone gonna be hanging around Tokyo or Osaka from Jan. 14th till Jan 21st 2015?  Come meet up with me and my brother)!

Thanks to this new thing called “The Internet” I’ll be connected most of the time and be able to work from wherever.  I’m also doubling down on stuff now so I don’t have to seriously work whilst hanging with the family.

 

 

The Purpose of Life

“What is my purpose???”

You know what this question is?

It’s a meaningless fu**ing question that hippies ask to make themselves sad.

A spoon was built for a specific purpose: To get food in your mouth.
A chair was built for a specific purpose: To be sat on.
A cup was built for a specific purpose: To hold stuff.

But those are inanimate objects.

Life on the other hand was created by chance and repetition. And only life that replicates continues to survive.

That means us humans have the exact same “purpose” as dogs, fish, plankton and trees:

You exist to reproduce and assist in the survival of your species.

Hey hippies and lazy bastards of the world endlessly searching for your purpose….there it is!!! The purpose of life has been sovled!

But see, froo-froo thinkers don’t want to admit this. The real answer is obviously staring them in the face, yet they won’t acknowledge it because it’s not the easy answer they wanted to hear.

It’s like asking a successful person what “The secret to success is.” The real answer is usually “A lot of hard work.” But that’s NOT what people wanna hear! They wanna hear some magic clue that lets them shortcut their way through the hard work.

So there you have it. The purpose of life is to reproduce and assist in the survival of your species.

Here’s breaking it down further:

If your penis/vagina is in functioning order, your original purpose is to reproduce:
It’s why young people obsess over fitting in, being cool, and finding love.

If you’re no longer able to reproduce, your purpose is to assist in the survival of your species:
It’s why old people like taking care of grand kids.
It’s why people feel so good when they volunteer.

If you’re not doing things that either lead to reproduction or survival of the species, what happens? You get depressed!

It’s your brain’s way of telling you stop asking what your god damn “purpose” is and go do something that gets you ahead in life or helps your fellow humans.

I’ve seen many people endlessly ask the question “what’s my purpose” and they always tend to get a little depressed about it because they can never find it.

They’re searching for something to give them meaning…..or something to give them “drive”.

What these people need is not a “purpose”, but these two things:

1.) LITTLE GOALS (this one is required).
You will get super-depressed if you don’t have a little goal. A Little Goal can making a certain amount of money, or finishing a project, or learning something new, or being the best in your line of work, or taking a trip, or improving your living situation. Your Little Goals will constantly be changing.

2.) BIG GOALS (this one is not required, but can be searched for).
This big goal should be so big that it can’t be accomplished in your lifetime. It will vary wildly for some people. A lot of people won’t even have one, and that’s alright too. Some people will have a burning desire to end starvation in Africa or some lofty goal, and that’s alright too. If you don’t have a solid Big Goal yet….don’t dwell on it….focus on your Little Goals first and a Big Goal will materialize.

So if you’ve ever been wondering what “Your purpose in life” is. What you’re actually looking for is a GOAL.

And your goals evolve and change in different situations.

If you live in a 1st world country and have a job, maybe your short term goals are to take a trip to the beach with your friends and finally buy that new condo you’ve wanted.

But if you just got kidnapped by deadly ninjas, your new goal is probably to escape. Your beach trip and condo probably seem like pretty unimportant things.

If you live in a horrible place with no opportunity, maybe your short term goal would be to beef up your finances enough to get out, or improve your community to be more like you’d want.
Your goals will be highly affected by your environment.

Your Little Goals will be ever-evolving.

Your Big Goals will be too.

Your “purpose” in life however will remain the same: You exist to reproduce and assist in the survival of your species.

When a musician is jamming the hell out….he isn’t moping around thinking “what’s my purrrpoossee?”
His Little Goal is: rock the hell out and entertain the crowd. And he’s fully engaged in it.

When a pilot is landing a plane…..he isn’t contemplating, “maaaan what’s my purpose??”
His Little Goal is to land the plane safely. And he’s fully engaged in it.

The mom juggling kids while cooking and cleaning at the same time isn’t thinking “What’s my purpose?”
Her Little Goal is to get her kids fed. And she’s fully engaged in it.

If you don’t have a Little Goal, then MAKE one!

-Be the absolute top performer at your job.
-Aggressively learn a new skill. Piano, coding, speed reading.
-Buy my KopywritingKourse and learn how to communicate ← survival of Neville in action.
-Start making extra money for a sweet trip.

Accomplishing a bunch of Little Goals leads to you accomplishing even bigger goals.

Since the purpose of life is to reproduce and assist in the survival of your species…..

Generally anything you do to improve your own value or improve others will make you happy.

Sincerely,
Neville Medhora

You will never be happy if you continue to search for what happiness consists of. You will never live if you are looking for the meaning of life.
–Albert Camus

Spending Account 2

In a land far-far away called ThisPlaceDoesn’tExistVille……everyone spends the same amount of money every month.

That means of all 12 months of the year, a person will spend maybe $4,000/mo for living/fun/bills. Like this:

January spending: $4,000
February spending: $4,000
March spending: $4,000
November spending: $4,000
December spending: $4,000

BAHAHAHA!! In RealWorldLand however, that shit NEVER happens! It’s more like:

January spending: $4,000
February spending: $3,000
March spending: $4,000
November spending: $7,500
December spending: $11,500

Notice those last few months shoot straight up.

Well pretty much EVERY year ever, I notice my spending goes sky-high in the last quarter of the year….and I’m not alone in this.

In October/November/December you tend to: Travel places to see family, buy lots of gifts, go to lots of parties, stay in other places…..basically A LOT OF SPENDING HAPPENS.

But years ago in college I did one smart thing, and that was create a separate spending account JUST for occasions like this.

I called it The Spending Account 2.
(ok…the name wasn’t so creative, but you get the point)!

In college I started stuffing in about $300 bucks a month to the Spending Account 2 account….so by the end of 12 months I’d have an extra $3,600 in the holiday season to spend.

At the time that would cover travel costs, allow me to buy some pretty decent gifts for everyone….and essentially lemme have some extra wiggle room to do/buy whatever I wanted for the holidays:

spending-account-2

Having The Spending Account 2 available for extra money made holiday shopping a lot more enjoyable, when you didn’t have to “budget” to buy stuff on your normal monthly burn rate.

If you have the option to create multiple bank accounts, I’d HIGHLY suggest you create a separate one that let’s you actually enjoy the holidays instead of dread it :)

Sincerely,
Neville Medhora – The Brown Santa Claus
P.S. You’re damn right I made a financial graphic using Emjoi!

November 2014 Goals

Ahhhhh I can smell the goals in the air.

This month is mainly a bunch of technical stuff such as porting over a lot of my biz stuff to InfusionSoft.

november-2014-goals

There is definitely a learning curve to any new system, but much of the work has been completed.  It’s also super exciting because the amount of extra stuff I can do with a more powerful CRM system like this opens up new doors :-)

September 2014 Goals

Here’s my goals for September 2014, a little late….sorry :-/

Some already fulfilled:
september-2014-goals

Much of this part of September I’ll be traveling:

  • Sept. 10th – 13th = Stamford, CT. for Titans of Direct Response.
  • Sept 13th – 17th = Manhattan just because.
  • Sept 18th – 21st = New Orleans for FinCon.

I’m writing this on a plane :-)

HustleCon 2014 – I went, I spoke, but Sam made $40K from it

Hey, Neville here:
I got invited to speak at this thing called HustleCon in San Francisco.

Overall it went off really well, met some cool people, and got a free trip to SanFran.  What’s even more impressive is that the organizer was a 25 year old named Sam Parr who walked away from the conference with over $40,000 of profit in his pocket.

I was originally gonna just write about my own experience there……but I’d rather listen to how Sam pulled together a conference within 2 months that made as much profit for him as an average American in a year.

Here’s Sam!

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Sam Parr Speaking Now: 

Konichia fellow Nevblogg-ers,

Sam here, from Hustle Con, a badass conference focused on nontechnical startup founders.

I decided to host Hustle Con last May but the real work started the first week of June. Before this, I had never actually been to a conference before, let alone organized one…but my blissful ignorance helped me sell 400 tickets in just 7 weeks and generate over $50,000 in revenue.

This blog post explains how I did it.

How I Hustle And Flow-ed

Since I’ve been asked the same questions over and over, I thought I’d write this blog post in question-and-answer format.

hustlecon-1

“How did I find the speakers?
Did I pay them?”

This is the #1 question people ask me, but the answer is quite simple: I just asked. And no, I did not have to pay a single speaker.

In the early planning stage, I thought founders of big successful companies would be way to busy to speak at Hustle Con. When you think about it, founders really don’t need me. I mean, they’re rich, are stupid busy, and get asked for favors dozens of times a week.

At first, when I pitched founders, I’d try to convince them to come by explaining how fun the event would be or how they could grow their business because there’d be 400 people in the audience.

That pitch left me with jack squat.

Then I tried something a little different.

Instead of telling them I’d how much business would be generated from speaking (very little, realistically) I’d ask them to “come spread your company’s gospel to a live audience of 400 people and an online audience of 2,500 (students in our Udemy course).”

This worked WAY better.

Think about it…it feels good to not only talk about yourself in front of a large audience, but also to appear as an authority figure on your topic.

Additionally, high growth startups can’t hire fast enough, which is why startups pay recruiters around $30,000 per hire. And one thing that I didn’t realize is that a founder’s main job is recruiting top talent.

See where I’m going with this?

Convincing a CEO to speak at my conference was MUCH easier when I told them about the audience. There would be 400 highly qualified startupers who are eager to work hard and thirsty for knowledge…aka a CEO’s dream.

Finally, there was one BIG, BIGGGGG thing that set me apart from everyone else asking: persistence. And not the annoying kind of persistence (although I was accused of that once) but the polite, I-respect-this-guy-for-working-so-hard kind of persistence.

You see, I use to send one, maybe two emails to a potential customer, conference speaker, or anyone else I wanted something from. But if you’re trying to get in touch with an influential person you’ll most likely need to send 5 or 10 emails before getting a response back. I emailed some of the higher profile speakers at Hustle Con 7 times before getting a yes or no.

Now, I know what you’re saying “isn’t that kinda annoying?” No. Not if you do it in a respectful way, such as a reminder email every three days for a couple weeks.

If you wanna see the detailed, step-by-step on how I contacted each speaker, then read the post “How We Found Our Speakers: 4 Ways To Get Ahold Of Anyone And Make Them ACT!”I used these methods to not only get in touch with all the speakers of Hustle Con, but also the founder of Twitter, GoPro, Business Insider, and dozens of others.

Oh, and I almost forgot to address if we had to pay speakers or not. We did not. I did pay for Neville’s flight from Austin to San Francisco, but besides him every other speaker paid their own way. I asked a few authors, like Ryan Holiday and James Altucher to speak, but they wanted between $5,000 and $10,000. I declined.

 

How did I sell 400 tickets in 7 weeks?

I could write an entire freakin’ book on this question, but I’ll sum it up in two words: COLLECT EMAILS!

hustlecon-2

Here’s how I did it:

1. Writing/finding blog posts: I wanted to publish around 12 blogs posts…one for each speaker. I wrote a few on my own, while the others were posts each speaker had already written that were applicable to Hustle Con. I found these posts on their blogs and asked for permission to repost.

2. WordPress plugins: Before publishing the posts, I installed the two plugins to collect emails: Interrupt and SumoMe.

3. Creating a drip campaign: After outlining each blog post, I wrote 12 emails that told a funny/interesting story about the speaker that then made the reader want to click and head to my site to read the entire post in hopes that they’d share it with their friends. I then set the emails up as an autoresponder using Mailchimp so new users would get an email every day for 12 days at 10 AM after signing up. This step is KEY and if you have no idea what you’re doing, then I suggest taking Neville’s Autoresponder Kourse.

Here’s nearly every email I sent: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

4. Publish and distribute the blog posts: Ok, so my autoresponder is set up and posts scheduled to be published. When publishing time came, I posted the blog posts on Reddit, Hacker News, dozens of Facebook groups, LinkedIn, Twitter, Growth Hacker, Inbound.org and asked the speakers to share the post written about them.

Bada-bing-bada-boom. That’s it.

Sounds simple, right? Well, kinda. This method took a TON of finesse and time but it really, really worked.

 

A few tidbits I should mention

1. We had linear ticket sales: I’ve never heard of another conference selling tickets as consistently as we did. 99% of conferences sell 80% of the tickets in the last two weeks. But Hustle Con had extremely consistent sales. In fact, we sold out four days before the conference, which is pretty good. Our first ticket sale was on June 9th and the last was July 28th.

hustlecon-3

2. High traffic and strong list: The Hustle Con site launched on June 6th and within just a few weeks we were averaging somewhere around 1,000 to 2,000 unique visitors per day. Our email list jump from 200 (pre-launch) to about 2,500 in 7 weeks. Not bad for such a young site, eh?

3. Branding: People loved our drip campaign because our emails were funny and unique. I know I get like 3,324 emails a day and 99% of them are just flat out crap and go straight to the ole’ trash, so I worked really, REALLY hard to make our emails killer.

My goal for each email was to tell a story, not sell. Storytelling works wonders and this made the Hustle Con brand memorable. In fact, I regularly received replies from folks saying how they couldn’t make it to the event but that they loved the emails and wanted to come next year. Of our list of around 2,500 emails, we average close to a 50% open rate, which is really good.

4. Give away tickets to influencers: To gain some extra traffic, I gave away 50 free tickets to popular friends of mine. This wasn’t a special process…I just found people with tons of Facebook followers and sent them a message inviting them to come for free in return for sharing our page on as their status.Yeah…as in a bribe. I didn’t even bother with asking them to share on Twitter, or as I like to call it, Shitter, because Twitter users rarely ever buy (in my experience).

5. Partner with other lists: Besides the obvious places like StartupDigest, WebWallflower, and Fetch, I made a list of dozens of Meetup groups and bloggers who I knew had huge lists and offered them 35% discounts. Pretty simple.

 

What did my cost breakdown looked like?

Most folks ask “ was Hustle Con was a success?” but I know what they’re really thinking – “how much money did you make?”

Hustle Con took in $56,844 in revenue and $40,212 in profit. I didn’t raise as much sponsorship money as I could have because I didn’t want lame sponsors coming so this number could have been WAYYY higher.

Here’s a breakdown of revenue and expenses

 

How did I get sponsors? How much did I get?

I was shocked so many companies would be willing to pay money to sponsor a conference. We raised around $19,250 in sponsorship money but looking back I think we could have done around $50,000.

In my opinion there are two types of sponsors: those who want brand exposure and those who want leads.

Big companies like, Microsoft, Google, and Amazon have a HUGE marketing budget to spend on conferences. These guys are not looking for a return but just want to be part of cool events to build brand awareness. When I contacted these companies I sold them on the event speakers because that’s what made them want to sponsor the event.

Then there are smaller companies like recruiting firms or startups who are looking for some type of return. At Hustle Con we had a few recruiters sponsor because a potential recruit is worth between $10,000 and $30,000 so the possibility of getting a few quality leads is totally worth a sponsoring.

I’m not sure how other conferences do it, but I looked at my event as having three customers: sponsors, speakers, and attendees.

Because of this, I only chose sponsors who I thought truly added value. This way, I could promote the sponsor a ton to the speakers and attendees without being annoying because it’d be valuable for everyone. After the event I followed up with each sponsor and am happy to say that we totally exceeding their expectations. Attention to detail and taking care of the sponsors is key.

The process of contacting potential sponsors went something like this:

1. Prospecting: I made a list of 120 companies I liked who sponsored 2 or more conferences in the past along with their head of marketing’s email

2. Email: I emailed each company to set up a call.

3. The call: I’ve never had a “normal” sales job so I’m not sure how a typical sales call looks like, but I created my own process that worked really well.

My goal with the call wasn’t actually to get sponsorship money but to get them EXCITED about Hustle Con. This way their company would send 3 to 5 employees regardless if they sponsored the event because they saw how fun and valuable the experience would be. I had around 20 calls with potential sponsors. 7 or so actually bought a sponsorship package and nearly all of them sent at least one employee.

 

Did I work on this full time?

Yes. I loved every second of it.

 

Did the process drive you crazy?

Hustle Con was hands down the most fun I’ve ever had on any project…and it just so happened to make money too. In fact, I really didn’t care about money at all on this project. Sure, I wanted it to be profitable but revenue was not my main focus. This type of attitude made HC so much fun to work on and I wasn’t stressed or going crazy.

 

How did you get 25 awesome volunteers for free?

Hustle Con had 400 people in attendance, 15 speakers, 2 cocktail breaks, 2 meal breaks, and 1 after party. There was NO WAY IN HELL I could do it alone, so I enlisted the help of 25 volunteers to  set up the day before and work the entire event the day of.

hustlecon-4

Most of the volunteers were folks who emailed me directly through the contact form on HustleCon.com and asked if I needed any help. The other volunteers came to me after seeing my Facebook post asking for help. Organizing the volunteers was a HUGE task. My roommate Nathan, who has led teams as big as 200 volunteers, was in charge of all of the volunteers. Him and I worked together to create teams of 4 and assigned each team a leader and a job. Then, we did a rehearsal the day before, which made everything run smooth as a baby’s ass.

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Welp, now you know what I know. If you found this useful then tell me in the comments section below.

And if you have any questions you can email me at sam@samparr.com, friend me on Facebook by clicking this link (I’m super active on Facebook), or read my blog, TheAntiMBA.com.

Oh, and Hustle Con is happening again in a few months. We haven’t released this year’s speakers and topics, but make sure to head of to the Hustle Con site and sign up to be alerted when we do!

Peace out!
-Sam

Click here to download Sam’s full article as a PDF